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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
GCOM-C (SHIKISAI)
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743065U99801800101Tracking
SLATS (TSUBAME)
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743066U9856245895Tracking
H-2A R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743067U9863546296Tracking
H-2A DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743068U9879446197Tracking
H-2A DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743069U99788744100Tracking
IRIDIUM 135
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743070U86752748100Tracking
IRIDIUM 138
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743071U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 116
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743072U8770570099Tracking
IRIDIUM 130
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743073U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 151
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743074U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 134
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743075U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 137
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743076U8770570199Tracking
IRIDIUM 141
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743077U8770470299Tracking
IRIDIUM 153
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743078U8662960797Tracking
IRIDIUM 131
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 22
201743079U86779776100Tracking
LKW-2
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 23
201743080U9750448895Tracking
YAOGAN-30 G
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 25
201743081U3560359697Tracking
YAOGAN-30 H
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 25
201743082U3560359697Tracking
YAOGAN-30 J
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 25
201743083U3560459697Tracking
CZ-2C R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 25
201743084U3562648396Tracking
ANGOSAT 1
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 28
201743087U036108359661449Tracking
FREGAT R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743088U036772358731464Tracking
FREGAT DEB [TANK]
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743089U504056272131Tracking
SL-23 R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 27
201743090U5133115489Tracking
SL-23 DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743091U5149216791Tracking
SL-23 DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 27
201743092U5150617291Tracking
SL-23 DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 27
201743093U5134814189Tracking
SL-23 DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743094U5134714789Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743095U9750248795Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743096U9750247894Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2017 Dec 26
201743097U9749842494Tracking
SUPERVIEW-1 03
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843099U9853752395Tracking
SUPERVIEW-1 04
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843100U9852950995Tracking
CZ-2D R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843101U9853651795Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843102U9755452895Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843103U9858353096Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843104U9753346095Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843105U9853847295Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M3
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 10
201843107U552219421538787Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M4
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 10
201843108U552219321543787Tracking
YZ-1 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 9
201843109U552271322016808Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 11
201843110U5518527210328Tracking
2018-004A
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843111U9851049595Tracking
2018-004B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843112U9850949595Tracking
2018-004C
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843113U9850849595Tracking
2018-004D
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843114U9850749495Tracking
2018-004E
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843115U9850749495Tracking
2018-004F
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843116U9850649495Tracking
2018-004G
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843117U9751149495Tracking
2018-004H
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843118U9850649395Tracking
2018-004J
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843119U9850649395Tracking
2018-004K
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843120U9850649395Tracking
2018-004L
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843121U9850649395Tracking
2018-004M
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843122U9850649395Tracking
2018-004N
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843123U9850649395Tracking
2018-004P
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843124U9850649395Tracking
2018-004Q
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843125U9850649395Tracking
2018-004R
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843126U9850549395Tracking
2018-004S
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843127U9850549395Tracking
2018-004T
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843128U9737034692Tracking
2018-004U
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843129U9736732891Tracking
2018-004V
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843130U9850549395Tracking
PICSAT
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843131U9850549395Tracking
2018-004X
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843132U9850549395Tracking
2018-004Y
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843133U9850549395Tracking
2018-004Z
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843134U9850549395Tracking
2018-004AA
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843135U9850549395Tracking
2018-004AB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843136U9850549395Tracking
FOX-1D (AO-92)
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843137U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AD
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843138U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AE
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843139U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AF
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843140U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AG
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843141U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AH
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843142U9850449395Tracking
2018-004AJ
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843143U9850249395Tracking
2018-004AK
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 12
201843144U9850249295Tracking
LKW-3
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 13
201843146U9750048594Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 13
201843147U9751149195Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 13
201843148U9750047694Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 13
201843149U9749646594Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 13
201843150U9749943294Tracking
ASNARO-2
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 18
201843152U9750649395Tracking
EPSILON R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 17
201843153U9750846994Tracking
EPSILON DEB
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 17
201843154U9864023093Tracking
2018-008A
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843155U9854752495Tracking
2018-008B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843156U9854652895Tracking
2018-008C
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843157U9854752895Tracking
2018-008D
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843158U9854652995Tracking
2018-008E
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843159U9854752995Tracking
2018-008F
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843160U9854853095Tracking
CZ-11 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 19
201843161U981069527101Tracking
2018-010A
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843163U8353129193Tracking
2018-010B
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843164U8353249295Tracking
2018-010C
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843165U8353449095Tracking
2018-010D
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843166U8352529293Tracking
2018-010E
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843167U8353450095Tracking
2018-010F
1st orbit: 2018 Jan 21
201843168U8353129293Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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