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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
2018-107A
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 20
201843867U035796357751436Tracking
BREEZE-M R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 26
201843868U041986355721592Tracking
BREEZE-M DEB [TANK]
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 21
201843869U4935664423633Tracking
HONGYUN 1
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 22
201843871U10010781062107Tracking
CZ-11 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 21
201843872U1001141640103Tracking
NAVSTAR 77 (USA 289)
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 12
201843873U552019620167718Tracking
TJS-3
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 15
201843874U035794357781436Tracking
CZ-3C R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 24
201843875U2835254233621Tracking
KANOPUS-V 5
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843876U9751050595Tracking
KANOPUS-V 6
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843877U9751050095Tracking
ISAT
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843879U9858957096Tracking
UWE-4
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843880U9858857096Tracking
D-STAR ONE SPARROW
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843881U9858857096Tracking
LEMUR-2-CHRISTINAHOLT
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843882U9858757096Tracking
LEMUR-2-TINYKEV
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843883U9858757096Tracking
LEMUR-2-REMY-COLTON
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843884U9858656996Tracking
LEMUR-2-GUSTAVO
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843885U9858656996Tracking
LEMUR-2-ZO
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 9
201843886U9858656996Tracking
LEMUR-2-NATALIEMURRAY
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843887U9858656996Tracking
LEMUR-2-SARAHBETTYBOO
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843888U9858556996Tracking
LEMUR-2-DAISY-HARPER
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843889U9858556996Tracking
2018-111Q
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843890U9858457096Tracking
2018-111R
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843891U9751647895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-3
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843892U9751347895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-4
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843893U9751347895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-1
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843894U9751347895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-2
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843895U9751247895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-6
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843896U9751147995Tracking
2018-111X
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843897U9751147995Tracking
2018-111Y
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843898U9751147995Tracking
FLOCK 3K-5
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843899U9751147995Tracking
2018-111AA
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843900U9751147995Tracking
FLOCK 3K-8
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843901U9751147995Tracking
FLOCK 3K-7
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843902U9751147995Tracking
FLOCK 3K-12
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843903U9751047995Tracking
FLOCK 3K-11
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843904U9751047895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-10
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843905U9751047895Tracking
FLOCK 3K-9
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843906U9751047894Tracking
2018-111AH
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843907U9750947894Tracking
LUME 1
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843908U9750947894Tracking
YUNHAI-2 1
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843909U5052551795Tracking
YUNHAI-2 2
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843910U5052451595Tracking
YUNHAI-2 3
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843911U5052451295Tracking
YUNHAI-2 4
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843912U5010981088107Tracking
YUNHAI-2 5
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843913U5010981091107Tracking
HONGYAN 1
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843914U5011001091107Tracking
YUNHAI-2 6
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 29
201843915U5011001092107Tracking
TJS-3 AKM
1st orbit: 2018 Dec 27
201843917U035786357721436Tracking
CHINASAT 2D
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 10
201943920U2735817181631Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 10
201943921U2734295143601Tracking
IRIDIUM 180
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943922U8762761197Tracking
IRIDIUM 176
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943923U8762861097Tracking
IRIDIUM 168
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943924U8671971799Tracking
IRIDIUM 173
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943925U8671971799Tracking
IRIDIUM 169
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943926U8762860997Tracking
IRIDIUM 172
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943927U8671971799Tracking
IRIDIUM 175
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943928U8762761097Tracking
IRIDIUM 171
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943929U8671971799Tracking
IRIDIUM 170
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943930U8762860997Tracking
IRIDIUM 167
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 11
201943931U8672472099Tracking
2019-003A
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943932U9751049895Tracking
2019-003B
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943933U9751349095Tracking
2019-003C
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943934U9751149095Tracking
2019-003D
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943935U9751248895Tracking
2019-003E
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943936U9751348195Tracking
NEXUS
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943937U9751248095Tracking
2019-003G
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943938U9751347995Tracking
2019-003H
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943939U9773122094Tracking
2019-003J
1st orbit: 2019 Jan 18
201943940U9751148195Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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