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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
HISPASAT 36W-1
1st orbit: 2017 Jan 12
201741942U035793357811436Tracking
FREGAT R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Jan 28
201741943U535332174622Tracking
TELKOM 3S
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 12
201741944U035791357781436Tracking
INTELSAT 32E (IS-32E)
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 8
201741945U035790357811436Tracking
ARIANE 5 R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741946U435778265632Tracking
ARIANE 5 DEB [SYLDA]
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 14
201741947U435696261631Tracking
CARTOSAT-2D
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741948U9852150595Tracking
INS-1A
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741949U9850949695Tracking
INS-1B
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741950U9850849695Tracking
2017-008D
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741951U9850749695Tracking
2017-008E
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741952U9850549595Tracking
2017-008F
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741953U9850449595Tracking
2017-008G
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741954U9850849695Tracking
2017-008H
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741955U9850849695Tracking
2017-008J
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741956U9850849695Tracking
2017-008K
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741957U9850849695Tracking
2017-008L
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741958U9850849695Tracking
2017-008M
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741959U9850849695Tracking
2017-008N
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741960U9850749695Tracking
2017-008P
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741961U9850749695Tracking
2017-008Q
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741962U9850749695Tracking
2017-008R
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741963U9850749695Tracking
2017-008S
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741964U9850749695Tracking
2017-008T
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741965U9850749695Tracking
2017-008U
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741966U9850749695Tracking
2017-008V
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741967U9850749695Tracking
2017-008W
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741968U9850749695Tracking
2017-008X
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741969U9850749695Tracking
2017-008Y
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741970U9850749695Tracking
2017-008Z
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741971U9850749695Tracking
2017-008AA
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741972U9850749695Tracking
2017-008AB
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741973U9850749695Tracking
2017-008AC
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741974U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AD
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 17
201741975U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AE
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 20
201741976U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AF
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741977U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AG
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741978U9850749595Tracking
2017-008AH
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741979U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AJ
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741980U9850649595Tracking
2017-008AK
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741981U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AL
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 22
201741982U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AM
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741983U9850649595Tracking
2017-008AN
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741984U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AP
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741985U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AQ
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741986U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AR
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201741987U9850649695Tracking
2017-008AS
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741988U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AT
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741989U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AU
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741990U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AV
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741991U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AW
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741992U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AX
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741993U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AY
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741994U9850549695Tracking
2017-008AZ
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201741995U9850649595Tracking
2017-008BA
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 20
201741996U9850649595Tracking
2017-008BB
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741997U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BC
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 20
201741998U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BD
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201741999U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BE
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201742000U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BF
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742001U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BG
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742002U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BH
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 17
201742003U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BJ
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742004U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BK
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742005U9850549595Tracking
2017-008BL
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742006U9850449595Tracking
2017-008BM
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742007U9850449595Tracking
2017-008BN
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742008U9850449595Tracking
2017-008BP
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742009U9850449595Tracking
2017-008BQ
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 20
201742010U9850449495Tracking
2017-008BR
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 20
201742011U9850449595Tracking
2017-008BS
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742012U9850349595Tracking
2017-008BT
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742013U9850349595Tracking
2017-008BU
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742014U9850349595Tracking
2017-008BV
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 16
201742015U9850249595Tracking
2017-008BW
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742016U9850249595Tracking
2017-008BX
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742017U9850249595Tracking
PSLV R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 15
201742052U9849647594Tracking
DRAGON CRS-10
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 19
201742053U5240839993Tracking
PROGRESS-MS 05
1st orbit: 2017 Feb 22
201742056U5240839993Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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