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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
TELSTAR 19V
1st orbit: 2018 Jun 30
201843562U035792357811436Tracking
FALCON 9 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 22
201843563U2717856238318Tracking
GSAT0221 (GALILEO 25)
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 26
201843564U562298022971834Tracking
GSAT0222 (GALILEO 26)
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 23
201843565U562304723022837Tracking
GSAT0219 (GALILEO 23)
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 23
201843566U562324923237846Tracking
GSAT0220 (GALILEO 24)
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 26
201843567U562314923089840Tracking
ARIANE 5 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 23
201843568U562291522900831Tracking
IRIDIUM 160
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843569U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 166
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843570U8771671499Tracking
IRIDIUM 158
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843571U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 165
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843572U86778775100Tracking
IRIDIUM 155
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843573U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 154
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843574U8771671399Tracking
IRIDIUM 163
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843575U86778775100Tracking
IRIDIUM 156
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843576U86779776100Tracking
IRIDIUM 164
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843577U8771571399Tracking
IRIDIUM 159
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 25
201843578U86779776100Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M9
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 29
201843581U552212121531786Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M10
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 29
201843582U552153721518773Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 29
201843583U5518517197327Tracking
YZ-1 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 29
201843584U552237522201805Tracking
GAOFEN 11
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 31
201843585U9768324194Tracking
CZ-4B R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 31
201843586U9744221891Tracking
TELKOM 4 (MERAH PUTIH)
1st orbit: 2018 Jul 29
201843587U035755357391434Tracking
FALCON 9 R/B
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 7
201843588U2729449182512Tracking
1998-067PD
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 10
199843589U5240839993Tracking
1998-067PE
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 10
199843590U5240839893Tracking
1998-067PF
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 10
199843591U5240839893Tracking
1998-067PG
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 15
199843595U5240640293Tracking
1998-067PH
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 15
199843596U5240840193Tracking
1998-067PJ
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 15
199843597U5240740293Tracking
1998-067PK
1st orbit: 2018 Aug 15
199843598U5240840193Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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