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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
KOREASAT 5A
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 28
201742984U035786357861436Tracking
FALCON 9 R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742985U2250031291929Tracking
SKYSAT-C11
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742987U9753150195Tracking
SKYSAT-C10
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742988U9753050095Tracking
SKYSAT-C9
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742989U9752950095Tracking
SKYSAT-C8
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742990U9752849995Tracking
SKYSAT-C7
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742991U9752849895Tracking
SKYSAT-C6
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742992U9752749795Tracking
2017-068G
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742993U9752649995Tracking
2017-068H
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742994U9752649995Tracking
FLOCK 3M-1
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742995U9752549995Tracking
FLOCK 3M-3
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742996U9752449995Tracking
FLOCK 3M-4
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742997U9752349995Tracking
FLOCK 3M-2
1st orbit: 2017 Oct 31
201742998U9752149995Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M1
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 4
201743001U552154921506773Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M2
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 4
201743002U552219421541787Tracking
YZ-1 R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 5
201743003U552239922159805Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 5
201743004U5518129176321Tracking
MOHAMMED VI-A
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 8
201743005U9864063797Tracking
CYGNUS OA-8
1st orbit: 2016 May 15
201743006U5240740293Tracking
ANTARES R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 12
201743007U5227119289Tracking
FENGYUN 3D
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 14
201743010U99812798101Tracking
HEAD-1
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 14
201743011U99809797101Tracking
CZ-4C R/B
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 14
201743012U9979761599Tracking
2017-073A
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 18
201743013U99820817101Tracking
2017-073B
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 18
201743014U9881946098Tracking
2017-073C
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 18
201743015U9881845697Tracking
2017-073D
1st orbit: 2017 Nov 18
201743016U9881845597Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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